Using augmented reality to make learning come alive!

As ISTE 2014 approaches, I begin to reflect on all of the amazing experiences I have had with my students this past year.  It was a little over a year ago when I took my practice to a whole new level with flipping and the incorporation of a lot more technology.  I attended my first Michigan Ed Tech conference (MACUL) in March 2013 and soon after, ISTE  in San Antonio.  This blog was one of the many things I created as a result of my experiences.

This year, I am not only attending ISTE in Atlanta, but I was also selected to present a poster session on using augmented reality to make learning come alive.  Augmented reality (AR) is the digital overlay of video on top of real-world images. I introduced my students to this “new-age” technology in the first-week of school during my introduction to laboratory safety and equipment.  Students used the app, Aurasma, to scan images that linked to a video describing the laboratory equipment and how to use it properly.  My trigger images were pictures of the equipment, rather than the actual equipment due to the irregularity of the light which did not work with Aurasma (images need to stay the same).  Students rotated from station to station and the beauty of this process was that each student heard the exact information.

Augmented trigger pictures for laboratory equipment

Augmented trigger pictures for laboratory equipment

 

Augmented trigger pictures for laboratory equipment
Augmented trigger pictures for laboratory equipment

 

Watch this video to see how it happened in the classroom.

The “bait was set” and my students could not get enough of AR.  I decided to implement an idea that I came up with during the summer of 2013.  “Why don’t I have the students create an augmented periodic table?”  This tied in nicely with a project I developed where students created a unique 3-D model of a specific element (see the gallery on this website for pictures) and an interactive Glog that informed the reader about specific information on the element.  Seeing how the students were already “experts” with their element, creating an informative video that was linked to a unique trigger square using Aurasma would be easy.

Trigger squares

Trigger squares

 

Wall with augmented cards arranged. Glogster posters hung around perimeter.

Each student was given a 4×4 card stock and instructed to create a unique image that included their elements symbol.  Duplicate element squares are shown due to the repeated elements in the different classes.  Aurasma instructed the students to link their videos to the image.  I learned that having all of the students upload their videos in to a common channel on Aurasma worked the best.  Click the video below to see this project in action.

The last augmented reality app that I incorporated into my curriculum was the Elements 4-D Blocks from DAQRI.  This app allows students to interact with elements on a whole new level while learning chemistry.  I ordered the wooden blocks off of DAQRI’s kickstarter project but you can download the app and print the paper cubes as well.

element blocks

 

 

 

There are six cubes with six different faces providing 36 naturally-occurring elements .  By scanning the iPad over the cubes, a 3-D cube appears revealing a sample of the element and other relevant facts.  I created an in-class assignment where the students investigated the different samples and how they interacted with other element blocks.  If two blocks interact, a new compound appears revealing the chemical equation.  Click here to see the PDF of the activity sheet.

 

Student using app "Elements 4D" for a discovery lesson.

Student using app “Elements 4D” for a discovery lesson.

Example of Gold(I) Iodide

Example of Gold (I) Iodide

Click here to see DAQRI’s augmented chemistry blocks in action.

The great thing about this activity is that students can now see more dangerous reactions happen.  They are excited about manipulating the blocks and learning more about chemistry than my middle school lab can accomodate.

I, as well as my students, have had a great time discovering the “magic” of augmented reality.  AR can really take your curriculum to the “next level”.

Thanks for reading!

-Ashlie

 

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4 responses to “Using augmented reality to make learning come alive!

  1. I think I just found my first ISTE session! When is your session? Thanks for sharing!

    • smithsciencegms

      Sorry Sheila! I just saw this. I hope you were able to find me by searching presenters. Let me know if I can help in any way!!

  2. Love the idea of the interactive periodic table. I don’t know what kind of technology is going to be in my new school, but if they have iPads I’m all over it.

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